SkinnySkiff.com Forum Network

Home Forums Microskiff Discussion New Skiff Build

  • Author
    Posts
  • #5450

    ghart
    Member

    Hey Guys,

    Nice to join a group like this. I’m from South Africa and the skiff community is very small here and there isant one manufacturer of shallow water skiffs. Hence the new topic. I would like to build a skiff for our local market but seeing as there isant really any competition or boats for me to view for reference sake I have little to go by. I have built many bass boats and come from a long line of builders so boats in itself is not new to me. I have done a fair bit of research on line and looked at a couple of microskiff builders but i would like to get the basics outlined for me on an ideal 14ft, 60″ tiller skiff.
    What should i be aiming to create? Deadrise? target weight? Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks

    #5453

    matt
    Keymaster

    I would go with a 16′ skiff, and not a 14′. The extra length will be much better for storage, stability and boat performance.

    The hull should be as light as possible depending on motor weight. You will probably need to think about weight distribution such as having the fuel tank up front with a 6-12 gallon capacity and use trim tabs to keep the skiff from porpoising at higher speed.

    My last skiff, a Hell’s Bay Devilray at 14’8″ needed 12″ trim tabs used to keep it from bouncing at speed and benefitted from the weight up front. Although that model has been discontinued many years ago in favor of the 16′ model.

    There are many 16’x60″ skiffs you can look at such as the East Cape Glide, the Beavertail Micro and the Hell’s Bay Whipray.

    The benefit in shallow water will come from how much of the hull bottom is flat and how much is V-shaped. This will also obviously effect performance on the pole and under power depending on the percentage of flat to v-shape you go with.

    #5455

    ghart
    Member

    Hi Matt,

    Thanks for all your feedbank. Well noted and will look into all the things you mentioned. Is there anyway to design a hull that will no require trim tabs to avoid porpoising?

    Thanks

    #5456

    matt
    Keymaster

    That will involve experimentation, but some have done it before. The Ankona Boats copperhead has an angled transom (rather than straight) in order to reduce the need for trim tabs, so that is one option.

    In my opinion I would not try and completely negate the need to install/use trim tabs as they make ALL hulls more versatile with their use even if the manufacturer states that they are not necessary. A customer who owns one of your future skiffs may have difference weight/loading needs than you forsee and trim tabs can help them.

    #6110

    stewartesq
    Member

    I recently built a 16ft flat bottom skiff. I’m thinking of adding trim tabs. Reading this post has convinced me it is indeed something that will benefit the boat.

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

MVD Brand - Web Design and Development in Orlando, FL